Sunday, June 17, 2018

Ohio Limits Opioid Precriptions - The Journey Begins


I have written previously about the raging opioid epidemic here in Ohio.  Attacking and reversing this tidal wave will require many weapons, resources and time.  Opioid addiction is a crafty and elusive adversary that will be difficult to vanquish.  Our battle plan will have to be nimble and adjusted over time, much as military leaders must do in actual armed conflict.

Here in Ohio and elsewhere, physicians must abide by new prescribing restrictions.  Prior to prescribing a controlled pain medicine, doctors are required to check the patients OARRS report on line, which catalogues the patient’s prescription history.  This would alert us if the patient was receiving controlled medicines from various pharmacies that the patient might not disclose to us.  Physicians and the public are encouraged to seek non-narcotic alternatives for pain relief.  If opioids are prescribed for acute pain, there is now a limit on the length of opioid treatment that is permitted.  There are exceptions which require additional physician documentation.  The above restrictions do not apply to chronic pain or pain suffered by individuals with cancer or are in hospice.  Importantly, these rules do not apply to medication-assisted treatment of opioid addiction.


Cure for Addiction Advertised over a 100 years ago.

There has been opposition to the above regulations from patients with chronic pain who are having difficulty getting their pain medicine prescriptions filled.  They are being turned away by their doctors, or told to consult with pain management physicians who have expertise in this discipline.  These specialists are extremely busy and it can be very challenging for patients to secure a timely appointment with them.  For a patient with chronic pain, this can be a vexing and agonizing situation.  And, if this patient proceeds to the Emergency Room, these physicians may be understandably reluctant to accede to a patient’s request for controlled pain medicines. 

I think and hope that these issues will sort out.  One can’t expect that new reforms will be flawless from the outset.  Perhaps, the net we are using now to restrict pain medication use is overly wide, as many initial proposed solutions often are, but we will narrow it with more time and experience. 

There is no law, regulation or policy that does not cause friendly fire casualties or undesirable outcomes.   Our criminal justice system, for example, demands a not guilty verdict, even if an individual has committed a crime if a designated proof standard has not been reached.  Society has accepted a balance in the courts and elsewhere.  We reject using a wider judicial net that would capture more criminals but would ensnare too many innocents.  It's an imperfect system by design.

Since no system is perfect, we should not aspire to achieve this standard.  We have to tolerate some level of error and fallout.  Similarly, the medicines that doctors prescribe are deemed by the Food and Drug Administration to be safe and effective, but we all know that they are neither 100% safe nor effective.

Our opioid strategy is a work in progress.  Surely, we all agree on the destination.  But, the path to reach that point will be marked by many pitfalls, slippery slopes and difficult terrain.  

Sunday, June 10, 2018

Teaching Empathy in Medicine - Lessons from an IV Drug Abuser

We’ve all heard the excuse or explanation that ‘it’s society’s fault’, to explain someone’s failure.  We hear expressions like this often when an individual has committed a crime or simply failed to succeed.  Personal accountability is diluted as we are told that this person came from an imperfect home, had no role models or ample education.

These arguments are often wielded by those who have been favored with society’s blessings and advantages.

As readers here know, I am not politically liberal and regard myself as an independent who usually votes for Republican candidates.  I did vote for Senator Sherrod Brown, one of the most liberal members of the U.S. Senate, a fact that astonished friends and family, as I had concerns about the character of his opponent that I could not overcome.  I am proud of this vote. 

Were you born next to a ladder?

A 19-year-old female was sent to me to evaluate hepatitis C.  She was unemployed.  She had used intravenous needles years ago and resumed using them a few weeks before she saw me.  Hepatitis C was not the immediate medical priority here. 

I felt that I was facing an individual who inhabited an alternative universe from mine.  While I am speculating, I surmise that she faced choices through her life that I never had to confront.  What narrative, I wondered, could this young woman have had that would lead her to her present destination, where she would be self-injecting poison into her body?   I am not relieving her of personal accountability for the decisions that she has made.  Adverse circumstances do not guarantee failure.  Indeed, we all know phenomenal people who have overcome incredible adversity and long odds to achieve and inspire.  I wish that their methods were contagious.  The woman before me, at least so far, was not one of these individuals.

Perhaps, she came into this world unwanted and unloved.  She may not have had adults in her life to build her self-worth and to help guide her.  Maybe, education was a closed pathway for her.  What caliber peer group was available to take her in to soothe her rejection? 

My point is that it’s always easier to judge someone’s failures from higher ground.   Would many of us have reached higher ground if we weren’t born with a ladder that was set up beside us to ascend? 

I’m all for personal responsibility and accountability.   I’m also making a case for empathy, a virtue that has not always been as strong as it should have been in my own life.  

If our ladder breaks and we crash, how would we like to be treated?

Sunday, June 3, 2018

American Cancer Society Wants Colon Cancer Screening at Age 45


Until last week, colon cancer screening for most folks started at age 50.  Why 50?   Why hadn’t the colonoscopy coming of age been set younger to prevent the tragedy of a 45-year-old, or an even younger person, developing colon cancer?   In the past 2 weeks, I had to give a young patient and his wife the sad and serious news that he had colon cancer.  Because of his young age, he never received a screening colon exam, as we routinely do with 50-year-old individuals.  Is it time to make an adjustment?

Our colon cancer screening system is not perfect.  It is not designed to prevent every case.  There have been people in their 20’s who have been diagnosed with this disease, and there is simply no way to capture them in the system.  Experts in disease prevention must carefully analyze disease trends and behavior to find the sweet spot of when to begin screening.  And, money is part of this decision.  Let’s face it.  We don’t have unlimited resources to pay for every worthy medical benefit. 

Determining when to recommend mammography, and how often this test should be done, is a very similar issue.


What Starting Age for Screening is a Bullseye?

Colon cancer prevention experts had believed that age 50 was the proper starting point for screening.  Delaying until age 55 would leave too many people at risk, and starting earlier would save too few folks and wouldn’t be worth the cost or effort.  That is, until now.  The American Cancer Society (ACS) issued new guidelines last week recommending that colon cancer screening start at age 45, a radical change from established dogma.  The reason is that colon cancer in younger people has become more common.   Keep in mind, this recommendation did not emanate from a gastroenterology (GI) organization who might be expected to endorse any system that would benefit GI practitioners like me.   The ACS revised its colon cancer screening guidelines on the merits.  We await responses from other respected medical organizations on this issue.  And ultimately, insurance companies and the government will have to buy in to this proposal.

This bold recommendation, if universally adopted, will save lives.  Maybe yours will be one of them.



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