Sunday, March 18, 2018

Thousands of High School Students Protest Gun Violence - Should We Give Them a Free Pass?


This past week high school students across the country walked out of school for 17 minutes to show solidarity with the 17 fallen Florida students and their families. There is not a human being among us who disagrees with their mission, except for a few deranged and cowardly murderers.  These kids are crying out for more restrictive gun laws.

Although I will offer a controversial view below on the walkout, let me say with clarity and sincerity that I am proud of these kids.  Since the horror in Florida, I watched them speak to us with passion, poise and eloquence.  While many of us may not agree on the best path forward, we can all agree that we have great kids in this country.

These kids are right and have a right to demand to be safe. Schools have always been an oasis for our children, places where they are to be nurtured, educated and protected.  I know that there are many teachers who would serve as a shield for their students in any situation, as they have so nobly demonstrated. 


Safe in School

Some public and private schools have  authorized the demonstrations, assuring the kids that no disciplinary action against them would be taken.  Moreover, Yale, MIT, Dartmouth, UCLA, Harvard and other colleges have announced that no high school protester’s college application would be adversely affected by their participation. 

Many high schools have differing views on the propriety of the protest.  Here’s my concern.  If colleges and high schools are taking a permissive stance on this protest, because they support the cause, have they opened a door that will allow future students to walk through?

My personal view is that students should not be permitted to leave the school during school hours without permission in accordance with established school policy.   Students, like the rest of us, are free to protest and express themselves when school is not in session.  Why must the demonstrations occur during the school day?  If school policy is violated, then violators should be prepared for the consequences, which should already have been codified and known by all those concerned.  Many students opted to protest and were prepared to be held to account.

What if the students' message was not for more gun control?  Would we expect equal treatment?

How would high school administrators, school boards, teachers, students, parents and colleges react to the following protest themes?
  • Students walk out demanding that teachers be armed.
  • Students walk out demanding that an NRA spokesman be permitted to address the student body during assembly.
  • Students walk out protesting against teachers who have been advocating for stricter gun control during class time.
  • Students walk out to express their pro-life view and demand abstinence education.
  • Students walk out demanding an end to standardized testing alleging they are racially biased.
  • Students walk out demanding changes in the curriculum reflecting a more multicultural approach.
  • Students walk out protesting the FBI and law enforcement who missed so many opportunities in Florida to intervene and prevent a horror. 
I don’t think we should have an elastic policy that stretches when we support a cause but contracts when we oppose it.  True fairness is when we have the same tolerance regardless of the content.  Free speech, for example, doesn’t mean free speech only when we agree with it. 

How do you think the Academy, high school leadership and the press would have reacted if high schoolers poured out during the school day carrying signs and shouting in unison, Build That Wall!  Do you think that colleges and universities would be racing for the microphones to give these kids encouragment and a free pass?


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